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Why no one has 're-invented' email yet

Why no one has 're-invented' email yet
From Mashable - July 17, 2017

You may remember the great tech crisis of 2014: Email was broken! We were getting so overwhelmed by the deluge of messages flooding our inboxes that we were missing more of the important ones. Our inboxes had evolved from helpful, at-times-cheery ("You have got mail!") tools into overstuffed lockers of digital dread.

I am not talking about about spam, either. That problem was more or less solved in the late 2000s with better filtering. But as email evolved to become the primary method of "asynchronous messaging"basically, messages you can get to laterit began to include every newsletter, deal offer, message, bank statement, receipt, and notification that we, in some way, asked for.

This growing torrent of not-quite-spam-but-still-annoying messages was a primary problem with email, and certainly one of the factors behind why messaging apps like WhatsApp, Snapchat, and even Slack began to really take off. There's a lot to be said for real-time connections to friends and colleagues without the borderline-worthless dross.

But the email address has been, and will continue to be, the first part of establishing an identity online, especially for anyone with a job. Even the trendy new app Blindwhere all the users work at tech companiesverifies its users via email.

You do not hear about any of these attempts to "re-invent" email anymore.

So we ca not stop using email, but many companies thought, "surely there's a way to fix it?" Google took one of the most promising swings with Inbox, a mobile-first app that changed how your inbox worked, applying artificial intelligence to group together similar types of messages and offering new tools like the ability to "pin" messages.

Others tried, too. Microsoft introduced Clutter, which promised to elevate only the most important messages in your inbox. And IBM took a shot at merging email with other resources and applike to-do lists, calendars, and meeting documentsto create a smarter, more connected inbox called Verse.

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