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Domhnall Gleeson Proves Once Again That He Can Do Anything

Domhnall Gleeson Proves Once Again That He Can Do Anything
From TIME - October 12, 2017

Everyone has a soft spot for Winnie-the-Pooh. Everyone, that is, except Domhnall Gleeson, who had never read a Pooh book until he was cast as the beloved bears creator, A.A. Milne, and picked one up for research. I was happy to find that they were good, he says cheerfully, sipping a soft drink in a plush London hotel in late September. Some things are inexplicably popular, but Pooh is not. You really understand why people love it so much.

Gleeson understands what its like to be popular, at least with casting directors: Goodbye Christopher Robin is only the third of his six films due out this year. The charismatic Dubliners talent is obvious from the eclectic range of roles hes taken on since breaking out as the affable Bill Weasley in the Harry Potter franchise. So far in 2017, hes bossed around Tom Cruise in the crime thriller American Made and creeped out Jennifer Lawrence in mother! In the forthcoming Star Wars: The Last Jedi, hell battle the Resistance as the ruthless General Hux.

The copper-haired 34-year-old is clearly unafraid of venturing outside his comfort zoneif he even has one. As an actor, you should feel like youre wrestling the material, like its using up your energy and your resources. You should be drained by the process, he says. I think the key is not to be comfortable.

Comfortable is not how audiences will feel watching Gleeson take on Milne. Far from the child-friendly stroll in the park one might expect of a film about honey-doped Pooh, Robin is a dark tale of child neglect and posttraumatic stress disorder. Gleeson stars alongside Margot Robbie, reuniting after their 2013 love story About Time, about a far more functional father-son relationship. In Robin, Milnes son (Will Tilston) yearns for intimacy with his distant father, a British war hero, who is too busy promoting the characters he created to spend time with the boy who inspired them.

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