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New York Police Are Investigating Sexual Assault Claims Against Harvey Weinstein

From TIME - October 12, 2017

(NEW YORK)Police detectives are taking a fresh look into sexual assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein.

New York Police Department spokesman Peter Donald said Thursday that investigators are "conducting a review to determine if there are any additional complaints relating to the Harvey Weinstein matter." That includes reviewing police files to see if any women previously reported being assaulted or harassed by the Hollywood film producer.

So far, no filed complaints have been found, he said, other than one well-known case that prompted an investigation in 2015, but the department is encouraging "anyone who may have information pertaining to this matter" to contact the department.

More than a dozen womenincluding actresses Angelina Jolie, Ashley Judd and Gwyneth Paltrowhave told The New York Times and The New Yorker magazine that Weinstein had sexually harassed or sexually assaulted them. Weinstein was fired Sunday by The Weinstein Co., a studio he co-founded with his brother.

Detectives in the NYPD's special victims unit were instructed to identify and speak with any potential victims, including the women who spoke about their encounters with Weinstein in a recent New Yorker article, according to a law enforcement official briefed on the matter who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

In The New Yorker expose, a former actress, Lucia Evans, said Weinstein forced her to perform oral sex in 2004 when she was a college student.

At least one other unnamed woman said she was raped by Weinstein, but the article did not disclose when it where it happened. A third woman, actress Asia Argento, told the magazine that Weinstein forcibly performed oral sex on her in 1997 at a hotel in France.

Under New York law, making someone engage in oral sex by physical force or the threat of it is a first-degree criminal sexual act. There's no legal time limit for bringing charges.

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